Ege Bridge (Boiling Springs, PA)
SOLD OUT

Ege Bridge (Boiling Springs, PA)

Pennsylvania

Ege Bridge, in Boiling Springs, PA, dates back to 1854. This beautiful, historic stone arch bridge traverses Yellow Breeches Creek.

Cumberland Drive-In (Newville, PA)
SOLD OUT

Cumberland Drive-In (Newville, PA)

Newville, Pennsylvania, Series

In an era of home theaters, multiplexes and internet streaming, there’s nothing quite like watching a movie on the big screen under a summer night sky. As time marches on however, increasingly fewer people are able to experience this good old-fashioned fun. At one time there were over 4000 drive-in theaters across the United States, but as of March 2014 they numbered only 348. Many have been lost to encroaching development. Others failed to meet the challenge and expense of digital conversion as movies on film became obsolete.

It’s a labor of love for Jay Mowery, co-owner of the Cumberland Drive-In Theatre. Jay’s father, Donn, built the drive-in after a fire destroyed a movie theater he owned in downtown Newville, PA. Situated amidst rural farmland at the intersection of routes 11 and 233 outside of Newville, the 45 x 96 foot screen has been drawing movie-goers since 1952. The theater has a capacity of 400 cars and features a snack bar and playground.

This mid-1950’s depiction of the Cumberland Drive-In also includes another area landmark. The familiar image of Newville’s Laughlin Mill appears on the movie screen. During the filming of the 1956 movie “Hollywood or Bust”, stars Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis are seen driving their red convertible past the mill on a road trip from New York to California.

Newville Fountain, Early (Newville, PA)
SOLD OUT

Newville Fountain, Early (Newville, PA)

Newville, Series

After the town water system was installed in 1896 some public spirited citizens raised funds for a fountain, and in the same year Henry Schreffler, his son, John, and Mahlon Williams dressed and laid the stones for the base and pool of the fountain. The stones were hauled to the site by Brady Killian, who used a wagon pulled by a team of six horses for the job. On June 1, 1897 the fountain was turned over to the town.

When the fountain was quite new, grass was planted inside the circle to the edge of the catch basin and there were cast iron Grecian urns planted with flowers sitting on the stone circle. In later years the whole circle was used as the catch basin and several generations of children enjoyed the goldfish which spent their summers there. In time the cast iron urns were replaced by more durable concrete ones, and the goldfish were removed. Nevertheless the fountain continues to delight citizens and visitors alike.

In 1996 it was decided to have a 100th birthday party to celebrate the fountain, which grew into an annual event. The Newville Fountain Festival was born.

—Brief history courtesy of the Newville Historical Society

Ramp's Covered Bridge
SOLD OUT

Ramp’s Covered Bridge

Newville, Pennsylvania, Series

Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, Ramp’s Covered Bridge is the only remaining covered bridge still standing on its original site in Cumberland County. At one time, 37 covered bridges could be found in the county, but floods, fires and the passage of time have taken their toll on the others.

Built in 1882 by Samuel Myers, Ramp’s Bridge encorporates the Burr Arch Truss style of construction. A less common feature in covered bridges is its window overlooking the Conodoguinet Creek on the upstream side. This painting depicts the bridge from the downstream side, but you can see the window through the entrance. The 130-foot long structure stands 18 feet, 11 inches tall and is located on Covered Bridge Road outside of Newburg, PA, seven miles west of Newville. Ramp’s Bridge is regularly inspected and is in remarkably good shape for its age. One can still drive through the single lane bridge, steering carefully to keep the car wheels on the raised tire planks.

Some say that the reason bridges were covered and painted red was to fool the cows into crossing the water by making them think they were entering a barn. Other theories include providing shelter to travelers caught in a storm, or even rendezvous points for courting sweethearts. Romantic notions aside, early bridge builders knew that a covered bridge would last at least three times longer than an uncovered bridge. The roof itself added to the structural strength of the bridge, as well as protecting the wooden frame from the elements.

Cumberland County residents take comfort in knowing that their last covered bridge is being protected and maintained, and this quiet, picturesque reminder of earlier times can still be experienced and enjoyed.

Newville Firehouse (Newville, PA)
SOLD OUT

Newville Firehouse (Newville, PA)

Newville, Series

1916 MUNICIPAL BUILDING AND AMERICAN LAFRANCE PUMPER

The two-story brick Municipal Building at the corner of West Street and Glebe Avenue in Newville, Pennsylvania was completed just in time for the delivery of the 1916 American LaFrance Rotary Pumper to Friendship Hose Company No. 1. The first floor was used for storage for the fire company’s apparatus and housed the borough lock-up. On the second floor were two meeting rooms, separated by a folding partition. This building was the home of the fire company for more than 60 years and was also used by the Civic Club and Borough Council for their meetings as well as for public events. For a time the police station was also located here.

The building, with additions, is now used as the borough office, and the LaFrance pumper is on display at the new home of Friendship Hose Company #1 in the old borough school building on East Big Spring Avenue.

— brief history courtesy of the Newville Historical Society

Trout Fishing at Laughlin Mill (Newville, PA)
SOLD OUT

Trout Fishing at Laughlin Mill (Newville, PA)

Newville, Pennsylvania, Series

After the death of her father, John, in 1758, Mary Atcheson Laughlin inherited a mill on the Big Spring in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. By terms of her will dated December 26, 1815, she left one half of the tract of land and the grist mill inherited from her father to her son, James Laughlin. The mill belonged to the Laughlin family for four generations. In 1896, John Laughlin’s heirs sold the mill and the nearby Cool Spring to the company which was building Newville’s public water system. The system’s pumps were housed in the mill, and Cool Spring was used as the water source.

—Brief history courtesy of the Newville Historical Society

Newville Train Station (Newville, PA)
SOLD OUT

Newville Train Station (Newville, PA)

Newville, Pennsylvania, Series

In its earlier years, Newville, Pennsylvania was a bustling community, and the Cumberland Valley Railroad was responsible for much of the activity. The first train went through in 1837, and from that time on until the station was decommissioned, raw materials, manufactured goods, and passengers made the area near the station a busy part of town. In 1876 this Italianate station replaced an earlier one, and it continued in service until the mid 1950’s. The station was torn down in 1994.

— brief history courtesy of the Newville Historical Society

Massey's Frozen Custard (Carlisle, PA)
SOLD OUT

Massey’s Frozen Custard (Carlisle, PA)

Carlisle, Miscellaneous, Pennsylvania, Series

In 1949, Jim and Geraldine Massey opened their ice cream stand in a converted gas station on West High Street in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. More than a half century later, the original neon signs continue to beckon crowds. Patrons wait in lines to be served cones, shakes, sundaes and slush drinks. The establishment has changed twice since its inception, but its name remains unchanged. Two original Electro Freezer machines continue to crank out rich frozen custard enticing visitors from near and far.

Newville Fountain (Newville, PA)
SOLD OUT

Newville Fountain (Newville, PA)

Newville, Pennsylvania, Series

After the town water system was installed in 1896 some public spirited citizens raised funds for a fountain, and in the same year Henry Schreffler, his son, John, and Mahlon Williams dressed and laid the stones for the base and pool of the fountain. The stones were hauled to the site by Brady Killian, who used a wagon pulled by a team of six horses for the job. On June 1, 1897 the fountain was turned over to the town.

When the fountain was quite new, grass was planted inside the circle to the edge of the catch basin and there were cast iron Grecian urns planted with flowers sitting on the stone circle. In later years the whole circle was used as the catch basin and several generations of children enjoyed the goldfish which spent their summers there. In time the cast iron urns were replaced by more durable concrete ones, and the goldfish were removed. Nevertheless the fountain continues to delight citizens and visitors alike.

In 1996 it was decided to have a 100th birthday party to celebrate the fountain, which grew into an annual event. The Newville Fountain Festival was born.

—Brief history courtesy of the Newville Historical Society

Dawn at Laughlin Mill
SOLD OUT

Dawn at Laughlin Mill

Newville, Pennsylvania, Series

After the death of her father, John, in 1758, Mary Atcheson Laughlin inherited a mill on the Big Spring in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. By terms of her will dated December 26, 1815, she left one half of the tract of land and the grist mill inherited from her father to her son, James Laughlin. The mill belonged to the Laughlin family for four generations. In 1896, John Laughlin’s heirs sold the mill and the nearby Cool Spring to the company which was building Newville’s public water system. The system’s pumps were housed in the mill, and Cool Spring was used as the water source.

—Brief history courtesy of the Newville Historical Society